Tag Archives: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

German match for leukaemia boy

Doctors hope a Nottinghamshire boy with leukaemia can undergo a stem cell transplant in May.

Roman Cusick, from Calverton, is currently recovering from chemotherapy.

If he is deemed to be well enough, he will receive cells from an umbilical cord from a German donor in a procedure at Sheffield Children’s Hospital.

In February almost 200 people in Calverton helped took part in a saliva test to see if they were a suitable match.

Leukaemia occurs when large numbers of white blood cells take over the bone marrow, leaving the body unable to produce enough normal blood cells.

Cord blood donation program turns medical waste into a lifesaving resource

Leukemia, the most common form of childhood cancer, affects the blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. It is often treated with stem cell transplants that replace the patient’s bone marrow cells with stem cells donated by a healthy individual. Successful transplant depends on finding a donor who is a close genetic match to the patient. That’s a particular challenge for patients from racial and ethnic minority groups, who may die while waiting for a matching donor.

But a mostly-untapped source of genetically diverse stem cells is right under our noses: Blood left in the umbilical cord after a baby is
Read More…

Successful blood cancer therapy

A new treatment regimen can help some patients who have blood cancer to live disease-free longer, University of Floridaresearchers and colleagues have found.

Low doses of a drug called lenalidomide can help hold off the return of multiple myeloma after bone marrow transplantation. Patients who took the drug to maintain health also lived longer than those who did not take the drug.

“In choosing maintenance therapy we look at a few things,” said study co-author Dr. Jan S. Moreb, clinical director of hematologic malignancies in the UF College of Medicine’s division of hematology/oncology and a member of the UF Shands Cancer
Read More…

Stem cell transplant can rectify infrequent genetic disorder in youths

Scripps Research Institute scientists have offered new hope for parents whose children suffer from the rare genetic disorder ‘cystinosis’ by showing through an experiment on mice that stem cell transplantation can successfully correct the defect (…)

In the study, the researchers used bone marrow stem cell transplantation to address symptoms of cystinosis in a mouse model (…)

In the new study, the researchers found that transplanted bone marrow stem cells carrying the normal lysosomal cystine transporter gene abundantly engrafted into every tissue of the experimental mice (…)

“The results really surprised and encouraged us. Because the defect is present in every cell
Read More…

Stem Cells from Japan Used in Transplant in Pisa

Image via Wikipedia

An extraordinary operation was performed in Pisa when a 5 year old boy from Tuscany with acute lymphoblastic leukemia underwent a bone marrow transplant last night with stem cells explanted from a patient in Japan where the only donor with virological and histological compatibility was found after a 6-7 month worldwide search. The stem cell infusion was performed at the Pediatric Oncohematology Unit at the University of Pisa Hospital directed by Claudio Favre, one of the seven internationally accredited centers collaborating with the national Italian Bone Marrow Donor Registry (IBMDR).

The infusion procedure, reported the hospital
Read More…