Tag Archives: University of California Los Angeles

Researchers Map Human Egg and Sperm Development

UCLA stem cell researchers from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research led by Dr. Amander Clark have developed the first biological resource that maps critical stages of human egg and sperm cell development during fetal life.

The resulting map has important implications for future research of infertility, such as for cancer survivors left unable to create eggs or sperm due to chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Another important result of this research is a better understanding of the cellular origins of testicular cancer, which is believed to begin in males during fetal life.

Missing link between blood stem cells, immune system discovered

UCLA researchers have discovered a type of cell that is the “missing link” between bone marrow stem cells and all the cells of the human immune system, a finding that will lead to a greater understanding of how a healthy immune system is produced and how disease can lead to poor immune function.

The research was done using human bone marrow, which contains all the stem cells that produce blood during post-natal life.

“We felt it was especially important to do these studies using human bone marrow, as most research into the development of the immune system has used
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Insulin, nutrition prevent blood stem cell differentiation in the fruit fly

UCLA stem cell researchers have shown that insulin and nutrition prevent blood stem cells from differentiating into mature blood cells in Drosophila, the common fruit fly, a finding that has implications for studying inflammatory response and blood development in response to dietary changes in humans.

Keeping blood stem cells, or progenitor cells, from differentiating into blood cells is important as blood stem cells are needed to create the blood supply for the adult fruit fly.

The study found that the blood stem cells are receiving systemic signals from insulin and nutritional factors, in this case essential amino acids, that helped them
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UCLA researchers demonstrate that stem cells can be engineered to kill HIV

Image by Trygve.u via Flickr

Drs. Scott Kitchen, Zoran Galic, Jerry Zack of the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center and AIDS Institute and their colleagues demonstrated for the first time that human blood stem cells can be engineered into cells that can target and kill HIV-infected cells. The process could potentially be used against a range of chronic viral diseases.

The study, published Dec. 7 in the-peer reviewed online journal PLoS ONE, provides proof-of-principle, a demonstration of feasibility, that human stem cells can be engineered into the equivalent of a genetic vaccine.

“We have demonstrated in this proof-of-principle study that
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Fresh, purified fat stem cells grow bone faster, better

UCLA stem cell scientists who purified a subset of stem cells from fat tissue and used the stem cells to grow bone discovered that the bone formed faster and was of higher quality than bone grown using traditional methods.

The finding may one day eliminate the need for painful bone grafts that use material taken from patients during invasive procedures.

Adipose, or fat, tissue is thought to be an ideal source of mesenchymal stem cells — cells capable of developing into bone, cartilage, muscle and other tissues — because such cells are plentiful in the tissue and easily obtained through procedures
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