Tag Archives: Tissue engineering

Stem cells show promise in cartilage repair

Johns Hopkins tissue engineers have used tiny artificial fiber scaffolds thousands of times smaller than a human hair to help coax stem cells into developing into cartilage, the shock-absorbing lining of elbows and knees that often wears thin from injury or age.

Reporting online June 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, investigators say they have produced an important component of cartilage in both laboratory and animal models. While the findings are still years away from use in people, the researchers say the results hold promise for devising new techniques to help the millions who
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SPAIN – Stem Cells, First ‘Engineered’ Trachea Transplant

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According to a recent article in Lancet magazine, the first “engineered” transplant in the world was a success. For the first time, a trachea was “tailored” to the patient before being implanted. 30 year old Colombian Claudia Castillo who suffered damage to her trachea due to tuberculosis was the patient in an operation that was particularly interesting for Italy, since the operation was performed in June by an international medical team led by Paolo Macchiarini, the head of Thoracic Surgery at the Clinic de Barcelona, in collaboration with specialists from the Milan General Hospital, and the
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From seaweed to stem cells

University of Wollongong researchers are growing jobs and materials from the sea for medical treatments through a project in the Shoalhaven area to farm and process seaweeds that will then be used biomaterials such as cell carriers in medical implants.

Seaweed extracts are already commonly used in goods as diverse as toothpaste, skin care products, paint, ice cream and salad dressing.

However, research in the field of glycobiology – the study of complex sugars called glycans in living organisms – is showing that seaweed has a major role to play in the development on new and biologically active materials for medical
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Expanding the uses of stem cells extracted from fat

Stem cells extracted from body fat may pave the way for the development of new regenerative therapies including soft tissue reconstruction following tumor removal or breast mastectomy surgery, the development of tissue-engineered cartilage or bone, and the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

An interdisciplinary team of Queen’s University researchers led by Dr. Lauren Flynn, a professor in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Anatomy and Cell Biology, has been working with stem cells extracted from samples of human fat and is developing new methods in the lab to develop these cells into mature tissue substitutes.

While stem cells extracted from fat cannot
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Life Stem Genetics Announces Collaborative Agreement with American CryoStem

 

Life Stem Genetics announced today a strategic collaborative agreement with American CryoStem Corporation.

 

CRYO is a leading developer, marketer and global licensor of patented adipose tissue-based cellular technologies for the Regenerative and Personalized Medicine industries.

 

Adipose tissue is an anatomical term for loose connective tissue (fat) composed of adipocytes (cells). It is used in LIFS stem cell procedures and currently is extracted via liposuction each time a patient has a treatment.