Tag Archives: Neuron

Protein may help restore lost movement after stroke

U.S. researchers have found that a supplemental protein may help restore impaired mobility of people who suffer from a stroke.
Naturally occurring in humans, the protein has proved to work well in restoring motor function in rats after a stroke, according to two new studies by researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI).
The researchers hope that the protein will also help humans.

Administered directly to the brain, the protein restores 99 percent of lost movement; if it’s given through the nose, 70 percent of lost movement is regained. Untreated rats improve by only 30 percent.

Report of the Brain Tumor Progress
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A humble fish helps us understand our own brains

Recent findings from the Laboratory of Neurobiology at Northeastern, led by biology professor and chair Günther Zupanc, and published online in the scientific journal Neuroscience, demonstrate the mechanism by which new neurons find their ultimate home — research that Zupanc hopes will offer insight into the regenerative potential of the human brain.

In 1989, scientists discovered that two areas of the human brain — the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb — are capable of generating neurons during adulthood. In the last decade, adult stem-cell research has shown that latent stem cells also exist in other regions.

In principle, this information could
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USA – Blind Mice Sense Light Thanks to Stem Cells

Image via Wikipedia

Human embryonic stem cells implanted into mice specifically engineered to have a serious retinal dysfunction resulting in blindness have restored the animal’s capacity to sense light during tests.
The results, published in international magazine, Cell Stem Cell, were obtained in the United States by a research group in the Department of Biological Structure at the University of Washington in Seattle. The study, performed by Deepak Lamba, Juliane Gust, and Thomas Reh, demonstrated that it is possible to obtain retina progenitor cells from stem cells derived from the embryo. The researchers observed, “In principle, embryonic stem
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Stem cells study aims to foresee schizophrenia

Using new stem cell technology, scientists at the Salk Institute have shown that neurons generated from the skin cells of people with schizophrenia behave strangely in early developmental stages, providing a hint as to ways to detect and potentially treat the disease early (…)

Currently, over 1.1 percent of the world’s population has schizophrenia, with an estimated three million cases in the United States alone.

The economic cost is high: in 2002, Americans spent nearly $63 billion on treatment and managing disability. The emotional cost is higher still: 10 percent of those with schizophrenia are driven to commit suicide by the
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Scientists Aim to Use Embryonic Stem Cells for Chronic Pain

Chronic pain, by definition, is difficult to manage, but a new study by UCSF scientists shows how a cell therapy might one day be used not only to quell some common types of persistent and difficult-to-treat pain, but also to cure the conditions that give rise to them.

The researchers, working with mice, focused on treating chronic pain that arises from nerve injury — so-called neuropathic pain.

In their study, published in the May 24, 2012 issue of Neuron, the scientists transplanted immature embryonic nerve cells that arise in the brain during development and used them to make up for a
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