Tag Archives: Nature (journal)

Meat produced without animals using stem cells

If we are to produce sustainable and healthy food for the global population of nine billion people that is projected in 2050, then we must think along completely new lines.

Imagine this: With a clear conscience you sink your teeth into a juicy and tasty hamburger. No animal has been slaughtered to deliver the meat, no new forest felled to make way for animal feed, no bovine methane burps have affected the climate and no slurry has been released into the environment. The hamburger also has a satisfyingly low fat content and the fat consists only of fatty acids that
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Nuclear transfer to reprogram adult patient cells into stem cells

The capacity to reprogram adult patient cells into pluripotent, embryonic-like, stem cells by nuclear transfer has been reported as a breakthrough by scientists from the US and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The work, described in the journal Nature, was accomplished by researchers from the New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute and Columbia University and by Nissim Benvenisty, the Herbert Cohn professor of Cancer Research and director of the Stem Cell Unit at the Institute of Life Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and his graduate student Ido Sagi. The latter assisted in the characterization of the pluripotent
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Stem Cells turned into insulin-producing cells

Scientists said on Monday they had used cloning technology to make embryonic stem cells that carry a diabetic woman’s genes, and turned them into insulin-producing beta cells that may one day cure her disease.

The team reported clearing an important hurdle in the quest to make “personalised stem cells” for use in disease therapy, but a bioethicist said the breakthrough also highlighted the need for better regulation of lab-grown embryos.

“We are now one step closer to being able to treat diabetic patients with their own insulin-producing cells,” said Dieter Egli of the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), who led
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Stem Cells: breakthrough in artificial human organ transplant

Researchers for the first time have been able to demonstrate fully functional complex tissues of human organs i.e. intestines, obtained using stem cell technology, which finds applications in laboratory research as well as medical purposes. The paper was published in the journal Nature.

“This is the first study to demonstrate that human pluripotent stem cells in a petri dish can be instructed to efficiently form human tissue with three-dimensional architecture and cellular composition remarkably similar to intestinal tissue,” said Dr. James Wells, a leading researcher at the Medical Center’s Children’s Hospital of Cincinnati. “The hope is that our ability
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Reversal of aging achieved

Harvard scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute say they have for the first time partially reversed age-related degeneration in mice, resulting in new growth of the brain and testes, improved fertility, and the return of a lost cognitive function.

In a report posted online by the journal Nature in advance of print publication, researchers led by Ronald A. DePinho, a Harvard Medical School (HMS) professor of genetics, said they achieved the milestone in aging science by engineering mice with a controllable telomerase gene. The telomerase enzyme maintains the protective caps called telomeres that shield the ends of chromosomes.

As humans age, low
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