Tag Archives: National Institutes of Health

Scientists Aim to Use Embryonic Stem Cells for Chronic Pain

Chronic pain, by definition, is difficult to manage, but a new study by UCSF scientists shows how a cell therapy might one day be used not only to quell some common types of persistent and difficult-to-treat pain, but also to cure the conditions that give rise to them.

The researchers, working with mice, focused on treating chronic pain that arises from nerve injury — so-called neuropathic pain.

In their study, published in the May 24, 2012 issue of Neuron, the scientists transplanted immature embryonic nerve cells that arise in the brain during development and used them to make up for a
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ScienceLive Chat about The Future of Stem Cell Research

Thursday August 4, 2011

Jocelyn Kaiser:
Hi everyone. This is Jocelyn Kaiser, a news writer for Science magazine. In today’s chat, we’re talking about last week’s court decision finding that federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research is legal. We’ll discuss what’s next for Sherley v. Sebelius and what it’s like to work in an area of research where policies are always changing. Guest Hank Greely, a law professor at Stanford, is here now and we’re hoping to be joined later by Amander Clark, a stem cell researcher at UCLA. Let’s start with a question for Hank.

Hank, why was this
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United Spinal Association Reports Positive Results of Stem Cell Transplantation to Treat Multiple Sclerosis

Study May be Key to Unlocking a Cure

An article published in the Summer 2009 edition of Multiple Sclerosis Quarterly Report, a joint publication of United Spinal Association (www.UnitedSpinal.org) and the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS), highlights the positive initial results of patients who have improving neurologic function after receiving a stem cell transplant, despite no longer taking any MS medications.

The results are reported in a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored study called HALT-MS to confirm whether high-dose immunosuppression followed by autologous stem cell transplantation will prevent MS attacks in patients who are not responding to available
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Scientists Find That Genes Have Help in Determining Our Traits

For decades, biology textbooks have been clear – our traits are the product of our genes. But a new study by Yale University researchers published Dec. 26 in Nature Genetics suggests another mechanism can regulate variations of traits even in genetically identical individuals.

A particular type of RNA works in concert with a common protein to protect organisms from harmful genetic variations without the help of genes, reports Haifan Lin, director of the Yale Stem Cell Center, professor of cell biology and genetics and senior author of the paper.

“This mechanism may help explain how ordinary
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No Barriers to Stem Cell Transplantation for Older Patients with Blood Cancers

Age alone no longer should be considered a defining factor when determining whether an older patient with blood cancer is a candidate for stem cell transplantation. That’s the conclusion of the first study summarizing long-term outcomes from a series of prospective clinical trials of patients age 60 and over who were treated with the mini-transplant, a “kinder, gentler” form of allogeneic (donor cell) stem cell transplantation developed at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The findings are published Nov. 2 in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association.

“Age is no longer a barrier to allogeneic transplant,” said Mohamed Sorror,
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