Tag Archives: National Institutes of Health

Scientists Find That Genes Have Help in Determining Our Traits

For decades, biology textbooks have been clear – our traits are the product of our genes. But a new study by Yale University researchers published Dec. 26 in Nature Genetics suggests another mechanism can regulate variations of traits even in genetically identical individuals.

A particular type of RNA works in concert with a common protein to protect organisms from harmful genetic variations without the help of genes, reports Haifan Lin, director of the Yale Stem Cell Center, professor of cell biology and genetics and senior author of the paper.

“This mechanism may help explain how ordinary
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No Barriers to Stem Cell Transplantation for Older Patients with Blood Cancers

Age alone no longer should be considered a defining factor when determining whether an older patient with blood cancer is a candidate for stem cell transplantation. That’s the conclusion of the first study summarizing long-term outcomes from a series of prospective clinical trials of patients age 60 and over who were treated with the mini-transplant, a “kinder, gentler” form of allogeneic (donor cell) stem cell transplantation developed at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The findings are published Nov. 2 in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association.

“Age is no longer a barrier to allogeneic transplant,” said Mohamed Sorror,
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Stem Cell Possibilities in Autism Research

Announcer: Recently, Dr. Ricardo Dolmetsch, an associate professor of neurobiology at Stanford, spoke with National Institute of Mental Health Director Dr. Thomas Insel. Devoted to Autism Spectrum Disorder research, Dr. Dolmetsch and his colleagues have generated stem cells from children with autism allowing them to study how the brain develops in children with ASD.

Dr. Thomas Insel: I thought a good place to begin the conversation was to ask you about your interest in autism and how that happened. You’re someone who trained in calcium channels… worked on very basic problems in molecular biology and now you’re interested in autism…

Dr.
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Baby monkeys born from stem cells

OHSU research demonstrates not all embryonic stem cells are equal; produces the world’s first primate chimeric offspring

Newly published research by scientists at Oregon Health & Science University provides significant new information about how early embryonic stem cells develop and take part in formation of the primate species. The research, which took place at OHSU’s Oregon National Primate Research Center, has also resulted in the first successful birth of chimeric monkeys — monkeys developed from stem cells taken from two separate embryos. The research will be published this week in the online edition of the journal Cell and will be
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Alzheimer’s disease potential treatment from neural stem cells

Frank LaFerla, left, Mathew Blurton-Jones and colleagues found that neural stem cells could be a potential treatment for advanced Alzheimer's disease

UC Irvine scientists have shown for the first time that neural stem cells can rescue memory in mice with advanced Alzheimer’s disease, raising hopes of a potential treatment for the leading cause of elderly dementia that afflicts 5.3 million people in the U.S.

Mice genetically engineered to have Alzheimer’s performed markedly better on memory tests a month after mouse neural stem cells were injected into their brains. The stem cells secreted a protein that created more neural connections, improving
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