Tag Archives: Medical research

U.S. Army Gives $700,000 to Stem Cell Therapy Research

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NeoStem, Inc., an international biopharmaceutical company with operations in the U.S. and China, today announced that it has been awarded a $700,000 contract from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (USAMRMC-TATRC) under U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity contract number: (W81XWH-10-2-0039).

This contract is for the purpose of evaluating the use of topically applied bone marrow-derived adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for rapid wound healing. The Company previously announced that this funding was included in the Department of Defense FY09 Appropriations Bill and will begin receiving funds to initiate the
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NSF award to stem cells engineering

From a simple blood draw, Krishanu Saha, a researcher in WID’s BIONATES research group and assistant professor of biomedical engineering, could enable doctors to create stem cells to develop drugs personalized to their patients.

As part of his $400,000 National Science Foundation CAREER Award over the next five years, Saha will focus on improving the process to directly evolve DNA sequences and proteins in human stem cells.

Stem cells have the potential to develop into many different cell types, which makes them ideal for a variety of medical research projects.

The evolution of synthetic DNA sequences in human stem cells could catalyze
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Researchers make human stem cells in pigs

Researchers have developed a new line of genetically modified pigs that do not reject transplants, an advance that allows for future research on stem cell therapies.

One of the biggest challenges for medical researchers studying the effectiveness of stem cell therapies is that transplants or grafts of cells are often rejected by the hosts.

This rejection can render experiments useless, making research into potentially life-saving treatments a long and difficult process.

Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have shown that a new line of genetically modified pigs will host transplanted cells without the risk of rejection.

“The rejection of transplants and grafts
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