Tag Archives: Kyoto University

Regenerative Medicine Generates Hope

With the motto Advancing Science to Heal the World the BU stem cell scientists who founded the Center for Regenerative Medicine(CReM) could be pegged as starry-eyed idealists or scientific superheroes. Or perhaps a bit of both.

CReM codirectors Darrell Kotton, Gustavo Mostoslavsky, and George Murphy have established themselves as venturesome researchers who are willing to share their discoveries with almost anyone. And they do it for free—bucking the prevailing trend to patent, publish, and protect scientific breakthroughs. The trio’s “open source biology” is just one of the things they teach to the next generation of stem cell researchers at CReM.

Open
Read More…

From Stem Cells to Lung Cells

Bronchi, bronchial tree, and lungs. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

How do you grow stem cells into lungs? The question has puzzled scientists for years. First you need the right recipe, and it took BU researchers Darrell Kotton, Tyler Longmire, and Laertis Ikonomou seven years of trial and error and painstaking science to come up with it. “A lot had to happen to make a lung,” says Kotton. “It was a little more complicated than Julia Child’s ‘heat, eat, bon appetit.’”

Kotton is a School of Medicine associate professor of medicine and pathology and codirector of the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM),
Read More…

Stem cells reduce Parkinson’s symptoms

Japanese researchers have been able to improve the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in monkeys by transplanting nerve cells derived from embryonic stem cells into their brains, the team has announced.

The finding is the world’s first reported success of its kind with a primate, according to the research team led by Associate Prof. Jun Takahashi of Kyoto University‘s Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences. It has been released in the online edition of U.S. journal Stem Cells.

After the transplant, the monkeys, which had been almost unable to move, showed improvements in their symptoms to the point where they became able to
Read More…

Stem cells reduce degeneration in motor neurons

Japanese stem cell scientists have succeeded in slowing the deterioration of mice with motor neuron disease, possibly paving the way for human treatment, according to a new paper.

A team of researchers from the Kyoto University and Keio University transplanted specially created cells into mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also called Lou Gehrig’s, or motor neuron disease.

The progress of the creatures’ neurological degeneration was slowed by almost 8%, according to the paper, which was published on Friday in the journal Stem Cell Reports.

Researchers cure mice with damaged spines using human iPS cells

A team at Keio University has used stem cells to cure mice whose hind legs were paralyzed due to spinal cord damage, the researchers reported Wednesday at a Tokyo symposium.
The team transplanted neural stem cells grown from human iPS cells.

Team leader Hideyuki Okano, a physiology professor at Keio, said it is the first time in the world in which the curative effects of “induced pluripotent stem cells,” or iPS cells, have been confirmed.
Currently, there is no effective treatment for spinal nerve damage and treatment using iPS cells gives hope of a cure.

“It is valuable that treatment using human iPS
Read More…