Tag Archives: Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Young Investigators honored

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This year marks the 35th annual Young Investigators’ Award program, when School of Medicine trainee researchers are recognized for their stellar accomplishments in the lab. The event will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. on Friday, April 13, in Mountcastle Auditorium in the Preclinical Teaching Building on the East Baltimore campus.

Researchers will celebrate and share their findings, and 13 students and three fellows will receive awards. Each award includes a cash prize and is named for a former member of the Johns Hopkins community.

Each spring students and fellows look forward
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Nanoscale scaffolds spur stem cells to cartilage repair

A spun 3-D scaffold of nanofibers did a better job of producing larger quantities of and a more durable type of the cartilage protein than flat, 2-D sheets of fibers did.

Johns Hopkins tissue engineers have used tiny, artificial fiber scaffolds thousands of times smaller than a human hair to help coax stem cells into developing into cartilage, the shock-absorbing lining of elbows and knees that often wears thin from injury or age.

Reporting online June 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, investigators say they have produced an important component of cartilage in both laboratory
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Stem Cell Corporation Scientists Create New Protein-Based Stem Cell Technology

International Stem Cell Corporation announced that scientists in its wholly-owned subsidiary, Lifeline Cell Technology (LCT), have developed a technology to modify human stem cells by using engineered proteins, called “transducible transcription factors” or “TTFs.” TTFs are designed to pass into stem cells and direct the stem cells to change into specific cell types that can be both therapeutically-useful and can be used as revenue-generating research products.

In contrast to more traditional cell therapy methods this technology does not require the use of viruses or chemicals, and has the potential to produce safe therapeutic cells from stem cells. In addition, the
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POTENTIAL NEW “TWIST” IN BREAST CANCER DETECTION

December 4, 2009- Working with mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins publishing in the December issue of Neoplasia have shown that a protein made by a gene called “Twist” may be the proverbial red flag that can accurately distinguish stem cells that drive aggressive, metastatic breast cancer from other breast cancer cells.

Building on recent work suggesting that it is a relatively rare subgroup of stem cells in breast tumors that drives breast cancer, scientists have surmised that this subgroup of cells must have some very distinctive qualities and characteristics.

Stem cells show promise in cartilage repair

Johns Hopkins tissue engineers have used tiny artificial fiber scaffolds thousands of times smaller than a human hair to help coax stem cells into developing into cartilage, the shock-absorbing lining of elbows and knees that often wears thin from injury or age.

Reporting online June 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, investigators say they have produced an important component of cartilage in both laboratory and animal models. While the findings are still years away from use in people, the researchers say the results hold promise for devising new techniques to help the millions who
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