Tag Archives: Induced pluripotent stem cell

Genetic abnormalities associated with the creation of stem cells

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Discovery sheds new light on the process of stem cell generation, and will help promote safer stem-cell based studies and future clinical trials.

Dr. Andras Nagy’s laboratory at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital and Dr. Timo Otonkoski’s laboratory at Biomedicum Stem Cell Center (University of Helsinki), as well as collaborators in Europe and Canada have identified genetic abnormalities associated with reprogramming adult cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The findings give researchers new insights into the reprogramming process, and will help make future applications of stem cell creation and subsequent use safer.
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Training Australian Scientists in Latest Stem Cell Discoveries

The Australian Stem Cell Centre (ASCC) through StemCore, its national facility for the provision of stem cells and advice, continues to build a world class Australian stem cell research community. For the first time in Australia, young researchers will be trained in the techniques of growing and using human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in research.

iPS cells, discovered in 2006 when Japanese scientists reprogrammed ordinary skin cells into versatile stem cells, have made a significant impact on Australian research and are recognised as one of the most important developments in stem cell research in recent times. By
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Wide-ranging applications for pluripotent stem cells

While applications of induced pluripotent stem cells in stem cell therapy may be limited to a few diseases, its applications in drug discovery are wide-ranging, and many more diseases can be targeted, Shinya Yamanaka, Director, Centre for iPS Cell Research and Application, Japan, has said.

The Japanese scientist, whose breakthrough was the creation of embryonic-like stem cells from adult skin cells, believes that the best chance for stem cell therapy lies in offering hope to those suffering from a few conditions, among them, macular disease, Type 1 Diabetes, and spinal cord injuries.

On the other hand, there were multiple possibilities with
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Adult Stem Cell Patients Continue to See Improvement Years After Treatment

Howie Lindeman was facing the loss of his career and Neim Malo wasn’t supposed to see 2011. They were each treated for heart disease years ago using their own stem cells to repair their damaged heart tissue. Several years following treatment, both men continue to see improvement in their condition and quality of life.

Howie Lindeman, 60, had a heart attack at 39 years old that severely damaged his heart. He went through several procedures including having stents placed in his arteries and his physicians were considering open heart surgery for a quintuple bypass. He was in constant pain and
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New Strategy Advances Stem Cell Culture Techniques

Stem cells – unspecialized cells that have the potential to develop into different types of cells – play an important role in medical research. In the embryotic stage of an organism’s growth, stem cells develop into specialized heart, lung, and skin cells, among others; in adults, they can act as repairmen, replacing cells that have been damaged by injury, disease, or simply by age.

Given their enormous potential in future treatments against disease, the study and growth of stem cells in the lab is widespread and critical. But growing the cells in culture offers numerous challenges, including the constant need
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