Tag Archives: Doctor of Philosophy

Source of invasive bladder cancer found

Philip Beachy, PhD, professor of biochemistry and of developmental biology, said they’ve learned that, at an intermediate stage during cancer progression, a single cancer stem cell and its progeny can quickly and completely replace the entire bladder lining.

With their model in place, the researchers then conducted two main experiments in the mice: In the first experiment, they looked to see what would happen in animals exposed to BBN when the sonic-hedgehog-expressing cells were marked with a distinctive fluorescent color. In the second, they used genetic techniques to selectively kill those same cells in animals prior to exposure with BBN.

In
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Stem Cells Show Promise in Repairing a Child’s Heart

Image by Gabriela Camerotti via Flickr

Those suffering from a damaged heart can be treated with their own heart cells. According to a recent research, heart stem cells from children with congenital heart disease can rebuild the damaged heart in the laboratory. The findings apparently have great significance in the health zone.

While conducting the research, cells were achieved from patients ranging in age from a few days after birth to 13 years. These patients were previously subjected to routine congenital cardiac surgery. The number of heart stem cells appears greatest in neonates, that reduce with progression in age. Majority of
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Stanford creates first PhD program in stem cell science

Stanford University’s Faculty Senate today approved the creation of what officials believe is the first PhD program devoted solely to stem cell science in the nation and, perhaps, the world. The new doctoral program in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine is also the first interdisciplinary doctoral program created by the School of Medicine in recent years.

School officials say the fact that the university is taking the rare step of creating a new doctoral program acknowledges the growing importance of stem cell research in the realm of biomedical science. The senate’s initial approval
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Genetics of Fragile X Syndrome

While only a small portion of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can be traced to their genetic roots, those that can are most often part of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most commonly known single-gene cause of autism. FXS is associated with the loss of the FMR protein (FMRP) coded by the mental retardation gene 1, FMR1 gene.

While scientists understand the biochemical nuances of these mutations, their implications on neuronal development and function remain a mystery. To address this puzzle, HSCI Associate Faculty member Stephen Haggarty, PhD, reprogrammed a series of both mutated and non-mutated cells back into a stem
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Predict graft-versus-host disease in men

If there’s one single image that universally connotes death, it’s that of a skeleton. But in the living human body, bones are a beehive of activity that, at the cellular level, is as lively and intricate as any dance troupe could perform.

Within the hollows of the long bones dwells a spongy tissue called marrow, which hosts stem cells responsible for the production of both red and a variety of white blood cells. The latter are the warriors, messengers, sentries and medics that compose our immune system. White blood cells defend against microbial invaders and scour our bodies for suspicious
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