Tag Archives: Cell potency

A New Role for Old Sox

Understanding the genetic underpinnings of the biology of stem cells is crucial for their use in disease research and treatment. Scientists have identified a variety of genetic factors that maintain self renewal properties in embryonic, fetal, and adult stem cells. But whether these cell types are controlled by the same or different molecules is a persisting question.

Recent work from HSCI Principal Faculty Konrad Hochedlinger, PhD, begins to crack that mystery. Sox2 is a gene whose expression is required for maintaining pluripotency in early embryonic cells and regulating tissue development in the fetal stage. But until now, Sox2 expression had
Read More…

Stem cells tolerated by immune system

Many of us know by now that stem cells are remarkably fluid in the types of cells they can become. But this fluidity, or pluripotency, comes with a price. Several studies have shown that the body’s immune system will attack and reject even genetically identical transplanted stem cells, making it difficult to envision their usefulness for long-term therapies.

Now Stanford cardiologist Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, and his colleagues have shown that coaxing the stem cells to become more-specialized (a process known as differentiation) before transplantation allows the body to recognize and tolerate the cells. Their research was published today in
Read More…

Adult Stem Cell Research Shows Promise

Scientists sporting white coats and safety gloves are working in a bright Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lab on an incredible project.

They are part of FDA’s MSC Consortium, a large team of FDA scientists studying adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)—cells that could eventually be used to repair, replace, restore or regenerate cells in the body, including those needed for heart and bone repair.

The scientists’ investigational work is unprecedented: Seven labs at FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research formed the consortium to fill in gaps in knowledge about how stem cells function (…)

Nuclear transfer to reprogram adult patient cells into stem cells

The capacity to reprogram adult patient cells into pluripotent, embryonic-like, stem cells by nuclear transfer has been reported as a breakthrough by scientists from the US and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The work, described in the journal Nature, was accomplished by researchers from the New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute and Columbia University and by Nissim Benvenisty, the Herbert Cohn professor of Cancer Research and director of the Stem Cell Unit at the Institute of Life Sciences at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and his graduate student Ido Sagi. The latter assisted in the characterization of the pluripotent
Read More…

Baby monkeys born from stem cells

OHSU research demonstrates not all embryonic stem cells are equal; produces the world’s first primate chimeric offspring

Newly published research by scientists at Oregon Health & Science University provides significant new information about how early embryonic stem cells develop and take part in formation of the primate species. The research, which took place at OHSU’s Oregon National Primate Research Center, has also resulted in the first successful birth of chimeric monkeys — monkeys developed from stem cells taken from two separate embryos. The research will be published this week in the online edition of the journal Cell and will be
Read More…