Tag Archives: California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Stem Cell Technology to fight Huntington’s Disease

Scientists at the UCSF-affiliated Gladstone Institutes and an international team of researchers have generated a human model of Huntington’s disease — directly from the skin cells of patients with the disease.

For years, scientists have studied Huntington’s disease primarily in post-mortem brain tissue or laboratory animals modified to mimic the disease. Today, in Cell Stem Cell, the international team shows how they developed a human model of Huntington’s disease, which causes a diverse range of neurological impairments. The new model should help scientists better understand the development of Huntington’s — and provide better ways to identify and screen potential therapeutics
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UC Davis stem cell researchers awarded $53 million

UC Davis Health System researchers who are working to speed therapies to patients suffering from critical limb ischemia, osteoporosis and Huntington’s disease received approval today for three separate research grants from the state’s stem cell agency totaling more than $53 million. Each of the research studies that can now begin at UC Davis are specifically designed to lead to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of human clinical trials using stem cells and regenerative therapies.

At today’s meeting of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) in San Francisco, the agency’s 29-member governing board approved five other grant
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Self-Renewing Neural Stem Cells

Abundant precursor cells can become many types of neurons without introducing tumor risk

In a paper published in the April 25 early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco and colleagues report a game-changing advance in stem cell science: the creation of long-term, self-renewing, primitive neural precursor cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) that can be directed to become many types of neuron without increased risk of tumor formation.

“It’s a big step forward,” said Kang Zhang, MD, PhD,
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4.3 USD MLN for Stem Cell Research in Multiple Sclerosis

A team led by Peter Schultz, Scripps Family Chair Professor and member of the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology at The Scripps Research Institute, has been awarded a $4.3 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to research stem-cell-based therapies to treat multiple sclerosis.

Because stem cells can change or differentiate into many different cell types (such as nerve cells, muscle cells, and skin cells), they hold the life-changing medical potential to provide a source of cells to replace those permanently lost by a patient.

The Scripps Research project focuses on restoring the myelin sheath—a protective covering that
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Scientists Identify Critical Process in Stem Cell Development

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have discovered that environmental factors critically influence the growth of a type of stem cell — called an iPS cell — that is derived from adult skin cells. This discovery offers newfound understanding of how these cells form, while also advancing science closer to stem cell-based therapies to combat disease.

Researchers in the laboratory of Gladstone Senior Investigator Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, have for the first time shown that protein factors released by other cells affect the “reprogramming” of adult cells into stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells. The scientists
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