Tag Archives: Biomedical engineering

ITALY – Stem cells to replace damaged ligaments

All those who have suffered ligament damage could benefit from artificial ligaments built biologically. But, experimentation on artificial ligaments, which could come from stem cells and naturally replace damaged tissue, will not continue. Speaking about the issue was Luigi Ambrosio, one of the researchers of the Institute of Technology of Composite Material of the National Research Council (CNR) in Naples, who contributed to the realization of this biological ligament. Two solutions were proposed by the Neapolitan laboratory.

One solution was to build a biodegradable structure out of hyaluronic acid, one of the components of ligament
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Linking science and religion

Shelley Brown was pointing toward a life of cutting-edge stem cell research. Then one day in 2010, she says, she encountered the divine.

“Something was moving, and I thought I must have hit the petri dish by accident,” said Brown, who had been trying to direct a set of stem cells toward bone cells during her Ph.D. work in biomedical engineering at the University of Michigan. “When I looked closer under the microscope, I realized the cells were beating. They had spontaneously differentiated into electrically coupled, beating heart cells. That’s when I felt at the mercy of God, and that’s
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UW Spinout, Beat BioTherapeutics, Aims to Make Stem Cells for Damaged Hearts

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Stem cell researchers have a lot of big dreams, and one is to someday regenerate damaged hearts. That is still many years away from becoming a commercial reality, if ever, but a few University of Washington scientists have formed a new company that hopes to make cells that can replace pacemakers, and someday rebuild damaged heart tissue that people are left with after heart attacks.

The company, Bellevue, WA-based Beat BioTherapeutics, is the brainchild of Chuck Murry and Michael Laflamme, a pair of UW stem cell researchers, and UW bioengineering professor Buddy Ratner. It has roots in about
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Stem-cell-growing surface enables bone repair

University of Michigan researchers have proven that a special surface, free of biological contaminants, allows adult-derived stem cells to thrive and transform into multiple cell types. Their success brings stem cell therapies another step closer.

To prove the cells’ regenerative powers, bone cells grown on this surface were then transplanted into holes in the skulls of mice, producing four times as much new bone growth as in the mice without the extra bone cells.

An embryo’s cells really can be anything they want to be when they grow up: organs, nerves, skin, bone, any type of human cell. Adult-derived “induced” stem
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NSF award to stem cells engineering

From a simple blood draw, Krishanu Saha, a researcher in WID’s BIONATES research group and assistant professor of biomedical engineering, could enable doctors to create stem cells to develop drugs personalized to their patients.

As part of his $400,000 National Science Foundation CAREER Award over the next five years, Saha will focus on improving the process to directly evolve DNA sequences and proteins in human stem cells.

Stem cells have the potential to develop into many different cell types, which makes them ideal for a variety of medical research projects.

The evolution of synthetic DNA sequences in human stem cells could catalyze
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