Tag Archives: Biomedical engineering

Repair cartilage using stem cells

The study Sun has been working on in Dr. Farshid Guilak’s laboratory has found that engineered cartilage constructed from a particular type of stem cell integrate well with host cartilage, but not necessarily in a uniform way.

Sun was one of about thirty biomedical engineering students who presented at the department’s graduation with distinction reception on April 26. Other students have been working on exciting projects in optic imaging of tumors, synthetic biology, and deep brain stimulation, among other topics.

Sun’s project focused on how induced pluripotent stem cells can be used to study cartilage regeneration and repair.

Stem-cell-growing surface enables bone repair

University of Michigan researchers have proven that a special surface, free of biological contaminants, allows adult-derived stem cells to thrive and transform into multiple cell types. Their success brings stem cell therapies another step closer.

To prove the cells’ regenerative powers, bone cells grown on this surface were then transplanted into holes in the skulls of mice, producing four times as much new bone growth as in the mice without the extra bone cells.

An embryo’s cells really can be anything they want to be when they grow up: organs, nerves, skin, bone, any type of human cell. Adult-derived “induced” stem
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NSF award to stem cells engineering

From a simple blood draw, Krishanu Saha, a researcher in WID’s BIONATES research group and assistant professor of biomedical engineering, could enable doctors to create stem cells to develop drugs personalized to their patients.

As part of his $400,000 National Science Foundation CAREER Award over the next five years, Saha will focus on improving the process to directly evolve DNA sequences and proteins in human stem cells.

Stem cells have the potential to develop into many different cell types, which makes them ideal for a variety of medical research projects.

The evolution of synthetic DNA sequences in human stem cells could catalyze
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New Strategy Advances Stem Cell Culture Techniques

Stem cells – unspecialized cells that have the potential to develop into different types of cells – play an important role in medical research. In the embryotic stage of an organism’s growth, stem cells develop into specialized heart, lung, and skin cells, among others; in adults, they can act as repairmen, replacing cells that have been damaged by injury, disease, or simply by age.

Given their enormous potential in future treatments against disease, the study and growth of stem cells in the lab is widespread and critical. But growing the cells in culture offers numerous challenges, including the constant need
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ITALY – Stem cells to replace damaged ligaments

All those who have suffered ligament damage could benefit from artificial ligaments built biologically. But, experimentation on artificial ligaments, which could come from stem cells and naturally replace damaged tissue, will not continue. Speaking about the issue was Luigi Ambrosio, one of the researchers of the Institute of Technology of Composite Material of the National Research Council (CNR) in Naples, who contributed to the realization of this biological ligament. Two solutions were proposed by the Neapolitan laboratory.

One solution was to build a biodegradable structure out of hyaluronic acid, one of the components of ligament
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