Stem Cells with potential to become eggs found in ovaries

(Stem Cells News image)

Researchers found stem cells in the ovaries of young women that have the potential to become healthy eggs. Applications of this discovery may help women have children that were once too old to or left infertile because of disease.

Natalie Melgar-Fetzer, a junior in ICS from Maryland said “It’s interesting because it can give women with reproductive problems the opportunity to have children. So many people want to have babies but can’t for whatever reason.”

Researchers have already created potentially viable eggs from these stem cells by adding a protein to them as well as a gene that makes jellyfish glow green. The presence of color indicated that the stem cells matured into eggs.

BYUH students gave their opinion on if women that are past childbearing age should have children if given the opportunity as well as other issues. Melgar-Fetzer said, “It depends on the health and age of the woman when she hits menopause, and if she would be able to provide for the child. I think it’s okay if you can give birth to a healthy child.”

Mckenzie Patterson, a sophomore from Utah majoring in psychology, said, “I don’t think there’s a set age where women should stop having kids, but the chances of having complications with pregnancy are so much higher in a woman’s body as it ages.”

Keana Lavea, a junior in history education from California, said “I think even if women can have their own kids after this therapy, they should still consider adoption. It’s an individual choice though. [Many couples] who can still have kids adopt anyway.”

A huge application of using these stem cells is in women who have cancer. Before they start chemotherapy, they may one day opt to preserve their stem cells until they are finished so they can still bear children. Still, the development of this discovery is progressing.

from http://kealakai.byuh.edu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=4860&Itemid=152

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