IPS stem cell treatment heads for human trials in Japan

(Stem Cells News image)

Clinical trials 05

The very first human trials of a treatment using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) in Japan will begin as early as next year, the government-backed Riken research institute announced on June 12.

Speaking at a meeting of the Japanese Society for Regenerative Medicine in Yokohama, research team leader Masayo Takahashi of the Riken Center for Developmental Biology detailed plans to begin using iPS treatments on patients with a degenerative eye condition. Transplanted iPS cells have not developed into cancer in animal testing, and the clinical trial will go ahead now that it’s confirmed that similar procedures do not pose a threat to human health.

According to the human trials plan, iPS cells will be cultivated to transform into retinal pigment epithelium — pigment-rich cells that nourish the retinal visual cells. The new tissue will then be transplanted into the opposite site of the retina of eyes of patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), a condition striking primarily middle-aged and elderly individuals that can lead to complete loss of vision. ARMD cases in Japan are estimated in the hundreds of thousands. If all goes well, the iPS treatments are expected to slow down the progress of the ARMD, and even partially restore the patients’ sight.

Takahashi and her team have already succeeded in transforming iPS cells made from patients’ skin cells into retinal pigment epithelium and transplanted the tissue into mice. None of the animal subjects developed cancer in the wake of the treatments — a major hurdle in clinical tests using iPS cells, though tissue in eye cells are widely believed highly unlikely to develop into cancer.

Plans for the clinical trial will now go before the ethics board at the Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation hospital, right next to the Riken developmental biology center in Kobe. If the trial plan gets the OK from the board and the government, the treatments will be carried out on five ARMD patients at the hospital as early as 2013.

from http://mainichi.jp/english/english/newsselect/news/20120613p2a00m0na005000c.html

Incoming search terms:

indian medical news rp cure, Japan brain stem cells human trials visual, leadhcl, www latest research on rp in india only.

7 thoughts on “IPS stem cell treatment heads for human trials in Japan”

  1. My father is suffreing from RP. Kindly provide me with the information if any cure is available in any part of the world.

    1. I am interested in forthcoming trials for retinitis pigmentosa as I have family members with this decease and wondered if you have patients who travel to Japan for be included in these trials.

  2. Good Day

    I am suffering form eye disorder

    I have the following conditions

    1. night blindness
    2. very poor visual field
    3. cataracts in both eyes
    4. very poor adaption when light changes
    5. high sensitivity when there is too much light
    6. left eye can hardly see the first letter on the chart
    7. right eye can read line 4 on the chart but see every thing very foggy
    8. can not see details on the people face however faces are recognizable when people are close about one meter to me

    please let me know if additional information is required

    looking forward to hearing from you

    Thanks

    Hossein

  3. Hi

    I am Mrs. Hemalatha from India. I am 69 yrs old. I suffered a central retinal artery occlusion withcilioretinal sparing in the month of March of this year and lost partialvision in my right eye. Please let me know if stem cells or any other therapy can treat this condition. I am willing to participate in any clinical trials. Please let me know and advise me on how to proceed as I am really terribly impacted by this condition. Will be very grateful for any treatment offered. Hoping to hear from you.

    Hemalatha

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.