Growing Spinal Discs, in Stem Cell Journal

(Stem Cells News image)

Two professors made Clarkson University history when their research on stem cells was published in a prestigious journal from Cell Press.

Professor Thomas Lufkin, the Bayard and Virginia Clarkson Endowed Chair in Biology (left); and Research Assistant Professor of Biology Petra Kraus.Professor Thomas Lufkin, the Bayard and Virginia Clarkson Endowed Chair in Biology, and Research Assistant Professor of Biology Petra Kraus published a research paper in Cell Stem Cell on transforming cells into embryonic stem cells.

Professors strive to publish in journals that have the highest impact factors which are cited many times per year, Lufkin said, and this is the first time anyone with an academic affiliation and currently working at Clarkson University has been published in a top-level Cell Press journal.

Lufkin said his research focuses on growing new spinal discs to replace those that have deteriorated and cause back pain. The paper examines how cells swabbed from a patient’s mouth or scraped from a patient’s arm can be turned into embryonic stem cells, which are then programmed to become spinal discs.

“In this case, the patient is the donor,” he said. “We won’t have to get tissue from somebody else and give it to you. There are no issues of graft rejection; it’s yours.”

Spinal discs can deteriorate and cause pain due to age or injury, Lufkin said. Back pain sufferers currently can choose to have the damaged disc removed and fuse the neighboring vertebrae, causing a loss of flexibility and increase stress on the adjacent discs. With regenerative medicine, he said, the old disc can instead be swapped out for a new one that is healthier and stronger (…)

read more:clarkson.edu/news/2014/news-release_2014-06-23-1.html

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